About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

The ACE Test Self Measurement of Adopted Childhood Abuse

ADOPTEE RAGE!

The ACE Test Self Measurement of Childhood Abuse
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The ACE study and self accounting inventory relates well and is a great tool for Adoptees., To encourage psychological well-being in the adopted child and adult adoptee's by validating the adopted child's experiences during childhood. If the adoptee's self examination reveals low ACE scores, the adoptee may have received that "Lucky" we adoptee's are always told about, having experienced a positive, nurturing, and socially acceptable adoptive home. 

On the other hand, when the adoptee finds their   self reflecting ACE scores in the billions............
The higher numbers of negative childhood experiences, situations that are of an unpleasant nature, reflect a childhood that puts a young person at risk for psychological and physical harm. The consequences of risk for poor future health outcomes
in adulthood.  

The ACE tests can be found at the CDC (link below) the questions are simple, the scientifically designed methodical and has been in use for ten years. The ACE is being utilized all over the world as it provides simple questions with yes/no answers to valid childhood situations. The ACE provides proven results for future risk of future healthcare probabilities. The ACE is based on the parent-child interaction during childhood that is the foundation and essential building blocks of human development. The ACE is a self-reflecting question/answer that encompasses the social aspects, psychological awareness, nurturing, neglect, abuse, sexual, habits, relationships and behavior within family dynamics that are simply stated in the questions posed. The questions provoke childhood memories and are designed by interrelated memory clustering for easily recall. 

The ACE is a positive step toward psychological recovery for abused adopted children, a great place to get started.    
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The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is one of the largest investigations ever conducted to assess associations between childhood maltreatment and later-life health and well-being. The study is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente's Health Appraisal Clinic in San Diego.
More than 17,000 Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) members undergoing a comprehensive physical examination chose to provide detailed information about their childhood experience of abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. To date, more than 50 scientific articles have been published and more than100 conference and workshop presentations have been made.
The ACE Study findings suggest that certain experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life in the United States. It is critical to understand how some of the worst health and social problems in our nation can arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experiences. Realizing these connections is likely to improve efforts towards prevention and recovery.


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The interrelatedness of multiple forms of childhood abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction.


Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Childhood abuse and other adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have historically been studied individually, and relatively little is known about the co-occurrence of these events. The purpose of this study is to examine the degree to which ACEs co-occur as well as the nature of their co-occurrence.

METHOD:

We used data from 8,629 adult members of a health plan who completed a survey about 10 ACEs which included: childhood abuse (emotional, physical, and sexual), neglect (emotional and physical), witnessing domestic violence, parental marital discord, and living with substance abusing, mentally ill, or criminal household members. The bivariate relationship between each of these 10 ACEs was assessed, and multivariate linear regression models were used to describe the interrelatedness of ACEs after adjusting for demographic factors.

RESULTS:

Two-thirds of participants reported at least one ACE; 81%-98% of respondents who had experienced one ACE reported at least one additional ACE (median: 87%). The presence of one ACE significantly increased the prevalence of having additional ACEs, elevating the adjusted odds by 2 to 17.7 times (median: 2.8). The observed number of respondents with high ACE scores was notably higher than the expected number under the assumption of independence of ACEs (p <.0001), confirming the statistical interrelatedness of ACEs.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study provides strong evidence that ACEs are interrelated rather than occurring independently. Therefore, collecting information about exposure to other ACEs is advisable for studies that focus on the consequences of a specific ACE. Assessment of multiple ACEs allows for the potential assessment of a graded relationship between these childhood exposures and health and social outcomes.
PMID:
 
15261471
 
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Growing up with parental alcohol abuse: exposure to childhood abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study is a detailed examination of the association between parental alcohol abuse (mother only, father only, or both parents) and multiple forms of childhood abuse, neglect, and other household dysfunction, known as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).

METHOD:

A questionnaire about ACEs including child abuse, neglect, household dysfunction, and exposure to parental alcohol abuse was completed by 8629 adult HMO members to retrospectively assess the relationship of growing up with parental alcohol abuse to 10 ACEs and multiple ACEs (ACE score).

RESULTS:

Compared to persons who grew up with no parental alcohol abuse, the adjusted odds ratio for each category of ACE was approximately 2 to 13 times higher if either the mother, father, or both parents abused alcohol (p < 0.05). For example, the likelihood of having a battered mother was increased 13-fold for men who grew up with both parents who abused alcohol (OR, 12.7; 95% CI: 8.4-19.1). For almost every ACE, those who grew up with both an alcohol-abusing mother and father had the highest likelihood of ACEs. The mean number of ACEs for persons with no parental alcohol abuse, father only, mother only, or both parents was 1.4, 2.6, 3.2, and 3.8, respectively (p < .001).

CONCLUSION:

Although the retrospective reporting of these experiences cannot establish a causal association with certainty, exposure to parental alcohol abuse is highly associated with experiencing adverse childhood experiences. Improved coordination of adult and pediatric health care along with related social and substance abuse services may lead to earlier recognition, treatment, and prevention of both adult alcohol abuse and adverse childhood experiences, reducing the negative sequelae of ACEs in adolescents and adults.
PMID:
 
11814159
 
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Childhood residential mobility and multiple health risks during adolescence and adulthood: the hidden role of adverse childhood experiences.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Throughout US history, US society has been characterized by its high degree of residential mobility. Previous data suggest a relationship between mobility and increased health risk, but this relationship might be confounded by unmeasured adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the relationship of childhood residential mobility to health problems during adolescence and adulthood and to determine how much these apparent relationships may result from underlying ACEs.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Retrospective cohort study of 8116 adults who completed a survey that included childhood residential mobility, ACEs (childhood abuse, childhood neglect, and household dysfunction), and multiple health problems.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Number of childhood residential moves and number of ACEs (ACE score) were assessed for relationships to depressed affect, attempted suicide, alcoholism, smoking, early sexual initiation, and teenaged pregnancy.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for demographic variables, the risk of high residential mobility during childhood (> or = 8 moves) was 1.7- to 3.1-fold for each ACE, and increased with the number of ACEs. Compared with respondents who never moved, the odds of health risk for respondents with high mobility during childhood ranged from 1.3 (for smoking) to 2.5 (for suicide). However, when the number of ACEs was entered into multivariate models, the relationship between mobility and health problems was greatly reduced.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adverse childhood experiences are strongly associated with frequent residential mobility. Moreover, the apparent relationship between childhood mobility and various health risks is largely explained by ACEs. Thus, previous studies showing a relationship between residential mobility and negative outcomes were likely confounded by unmeasured ACEs.
PMID:
 
16330731
 
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]