About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Saturday, September 6, 2014

The Importance of Culture in Human Identity, The Cultural Depravity Of Adopted Children

ADOPTEE RAGE!

The Importance Of Culture In Human Identity

Cultural Depravity In Adopted Children
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 The adopted child is "used" by a selfish society to fulfill the personal needs, voids and desires of the individual that intentionally acquires an adopted child for their temporary purpose. 
The Child Adoption Industry in the United States is a disreputable institution filled with unsavory characters that profit of the pimped out children. The adoption gambling odds statistical range around 50% failure fates, where the child always experiences the loss.
Adopted and foster children, considered the non-biological variable, constituting the number one population classified group of children at risk for verbal, physical and sexual abuse and the number one risk of death in child populations in the United States. 
Aside from the factual statistics of risks in non-biological children, is the lack of identity, due to the closed adoption system that keeps children from knowing the true identity of who they are and the false identity created and instituted by the adoptive parent to reduce the parent's fear of the real parents.
The loss of identity and the culture that the child is deprived of is a monumental problem in adopted children and in adulthood living as a stranger to one's own self. The depravity of identity and culture and society's expectation that adopted children are forced to accept the status of living a lie and lying to one's self as in the psychological and cultural genocide of the human adopted child's forced life existence. Adopted children never have a choice in their own lives, where society perpetuates the abusive actions of using children to fulfill the desires of selfish adoptive parents.
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What is Culture:



Culture is important because When the word "culture" is mentioned, we can think of many things as "cultural", such as language, clothings... etc, because we classify cultures of different places. However, culture is so valuable that it has to be kept for thousands of years,and passed on by one generation to another. Culture is so important that it is more than its distinct visible features, if we extends this to the inner self of a person, to members within a society, further to the whole community, maybe we can find some answers by finding out how they are affected by culture.and also...Since culture can form invisible bonds between members in the community, this can hold people with the same cultural background together, passing on the values. This propogation of values is can not only transmit culture knowledge and retain the relationship among people, it also builds up a long term tradition after years and years. Culture is strengthened in this way because it can give background and reference to its later generations of its ability of keeping the long-term tradition, gaining the sense of belonging of people to the country of that culture.Last But Not Least,Culture is important because it explains what that place is also about and its history
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Culture is that invisible bond, which ties the people of a community together. It refers to the pattern of human activity. The art, literature, language and religion of a community represent the community's culture. Culture manifests itself through the lifestyle of the individuals of a community. The moral values of the people of a community also represent their culture. The importance of culture lies in its close association with the living of the people. Different cultures of the world have brought in diversity in the ways of life of the people inhabiting different parts of the world.

Culture is related to the development of one's attitude. One's culture plays an important role in shaping the principles of the individual's life. The cultural values of an individual have a deep impact on his/her attitude towards life. According to the behaviorist definition of culture, it is the ultimate system of social control where people monitor their own standards and behavior. A community's culture lays the foundation of the living of its people. The cultural values serve as the founding principles of one's life. They shape an individual's thinking and influence his/her mindset.

Culture gives an individual a unique identity. The culture of a community gives its people a character of their own. Culture shapes the personality of a community. The language that a community speaks, the art forms it hosts, its staple food, its customs, traditions and festivities comprise the community's culture. The importance of culture cannot be stressed enough as it is an integral part of living.
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The indisputable fact that no society can exist without a culture, knowing that culture is the way of life of a people. Therefore, every society, no matter of its size or population must exist with certain cultural values and norms. Liberia, being a part of the member of the globe, is not exempted from this practice. Because of the importance of culture, it rare to see a society without culture, as this can be likened to a ship without as compass.
Regrettably, one is of concern to many is the failure of societies to carry on those cultural practices that were left by their forefathers. Culture, is one of the one of the dynamic features that make up the Liberian societies/communities. However, it is sad to note that not much attention is being paid to this aspect of the country by citizens, traditional leaders and the Government especially the Ministry of Information, Culture and Tourism.
The role of culture in our society today has been damaged because to what I refer to as the forgetfulness of the past and the neglect of our cultural heritage. The purpose for which other African countries around us still maintain their cultural values is because they respect and obey their culture or way of life of their ancestors.
Before I go further to discuss the issue of culture and national identities in our society today let us know what culture and national identity is.
As I said initially, every society or Country has its own culture and national identity that distinguishes it from other societies. Again, when we speak of the term culture, we simply want to examine the way and manner people do things in every given society. How do Liberians eat? How do they marry? How do they bury the dead? The answers to these questions make up the Liberian Culture.
According to my research culture is defined as the language, beliefs, values, and norms that combine to make up the way of life of any society. The term civilization is similar, but not the same as culture. Civilization is used mostly to refer to the advanced way of life and the things that improve a society. Civilization is therefore, an improved form of Culture. Culture, on the other hand, is any way of live; whether simple or complex.
According to research conducted National Identity is a person's identity and sense of belonging to one state or to one nation, a feeling one shares with a group of people, regardless of one's citizenship status. "Yoonmi Lee sees national identity in psychological terms as "an awareness of difference" - "a feeling and recognition of 'we' and 'they'".
Features that are common to all the ethnic groups in Africa with attention on Liberia that are to bind the people together have been destroyed by the infusion of the Western culture (Civilization). For example; female genital mutilation, in Liberia the Poro and Sande bushes and other practices like festivals, during which traditional leaders settle disputes and tribal conflicts amongst citizens and groups in a particular area. The lack of these practices can be attributed to the level of high indiscipline and deviant behavior in the country today is posing a serious threat to our societies.
One of the things that make every culture homogeneous is the practice of chieftaincy. There should be chiefs in almost every community in Liberia because they are the traditional leaders in the various communities. The belief in chieftaincy institutions distinguishes Africa from other European Countries. Liberia being an African country pays less attention to the issue of chieftaincy institutions which has resulted to local communities being ruled on friendship basis not on the issue of tradition.
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Cultural identity is the identity or feeling of belonging to, as part of the self-conception and self-perception to nationality, ethnicity, religion, social class, generation, locality and any kind of social group that have its own distinct culture, in this way that cultural identity is both characteristic of the identity but also to the culturally identical group that has its members sharing the same cultural identity. Cultural identity is similar to and overlaps with, identity politics.


The Jean S. Phinney Three-Stage Model of Ethnic Identity Development is a widely accepted view of the formation of cultural identity. In this model cultural Identity is often developed through a three-stage process: unexamined cultural identity, cultural identity search, and cultural identity achievement.
Unexamined cultural identity: "a stage where one's cultural characteristics are taken for granted, and consequently there is little interest in exploring cultural issues." This for example is the stage one is in throughout their childhood when one doesn't distinguish between cultural characteristics of their household and others. Usually a person in this stage accepts the ideas they find on culture from their parents, the media, community, and others.
An example of thought in this stage: "I don't have a culture I'm just an American." "My parents tell me about where they lived, but what do I care? I've never lived there."
Cultural identity search: "is the process of exploration and questioning about one's culture in order to learn more about it and to understand the implications of membership in that culture." During this stage a person will begin to question why they hold their beliefs and compare it to the beliefs of other cultures. For some this stage may arise from a turning point in their life or from a growing awareness of other cultures. This stage is characterized by growing awareness in social and political forums and a desire to learn more about culture. This can be expressed by asking family members questions about heritage, visiting museums, reading of relevant cultural sources, enrolling in school courses, or attendance at cultural events. This stage might have an emotional component as well.
An example of thought in this stage: "I want to know what we do and how our culture is different from others." "There are a lot of non-Japanese people around me, and it gets pretty confusing to try and decide who I am."
Cultural identity achievement: "is characterized by a clear, confident acceptance of oneself and an internalization of one's cultural identity." In this stage people often allow the acceptance of their cultural identity play a role in their future choices such as how to raise children, how to deal with stereotypes and any discrimination, and approach negative perceptions. This usually leads to an increase in self-confidence and positive psychological adjustment

The Jean S. Phinney Three-Stage Model of Ethnic Identity Development is a widely accepted view of the formation of cultural identity. In this model cultural Identity is often developed through a three-stage process: unexamined cultural identity, cultural identity search, and cultural identity achievement.
Unexamined cultural identity: "a stage where one's cultural characteristics are taken for granted, and consequently there is little interest in exploring cultural issues." This for example is the stage one is in throughout their childhood when one doesn't distinguish between cultural characteristics of their household and others. Usually a person in this stage accepts the ideas they find on culture from their parents, the media, community, and others.
An example of thought in this stage: "I don't have a culture I'm just an American." "My parents tell me about where they lived, but what do I care? I've never lived there."
Cultural identity search: "is the process of exploration and questioning about one's culture in order to learn more about it and to understand the implications of membership in that culture." During this stage a person will begin to question why they hold their beliefs and compare it to the beliefs of other cultures. For some this stage may arise from a turning point in their life or from a growing awareness of other cultures. This stage is characterized by growing awareness in social and political forums and a desire to learn more about culture. This can be expressed by asking family members questions about heritage, visiting museums, reading of relevant cultural sources, enrolling in school courses, or attendance at cultural events. This stage might have an emotional component as well.
An example of thought in this stage: "I want to know what we do and how our culture is different from others." "There are a lot of non-Japanese people around me, and it gets pretty confusing to try and decide who I am."
Cultural identity achievement: "is characterized by a clear, confident acceptance of oneself and an internalization of one's cultural identity." In this stage people often allow the acceptance of their cultural identity play a role in their future choices such as how to raise children, how to deal with stereotypes and any discrimination, and approach negative perceptions. This usually leads to an increase in self-confidence and positive psychological adjustment
Culture (from Latin: cultura, lit. "cultivation") is a concept based on a term first used in Classical Antiquity by the Roman orator Cicero: "cultura animi" (cultivation of the soul). This non-agricultural use of the term "culture" re-appeared in modern Europe in the 17th century referring to the betterment or refinement of individuals, especially through education. During the 18th and 19th century it came to refer more frequently to the common reference points of whole peoples, and discussion of the term was often connected to national aspirations or ideals. Some scientists such as Edward Taylor used the term "culture" to refer to a universal human capacity.
In the 20th century, "culture" emerged as a central concept in Anthropology, encompassing the range of human phenomena that cannot be directly attributed to genetic inheritance. Specifically, the term "culture" in American anthropology had two meanings:
  1. the evolved human capacity to classify and represent experiences with symbols, and to act imaginatively and creatively; and
  2. the distinct ways that people, who live differently, classified and represented their experiences, and acted creatively.
Hoebel describes culture as an integrated system of learned behavior patterns which are characteristic of the members of a society and which are not a result of biological inheritance.
Distinctions are currently made between the physical artifacts created by a society, its so-called material culture, and everything else, the intangibles such as language, customs, etc. that are the main referent of the term "culture".
Cultural heritage is the legacy of physical artifacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations. Cultural heritage includes tangible culture (such as buildings, monuments, landscapes, books, works of art, and artifacts), intangible culture (such as folklore, traditions, language, and knowledge), and natural heritage (including culturally significant landscapes, and biodiversity).
The deliberate act of keeping cultural heritage from the present for the future is known as preservation (American English) or 
Conservation (British English), though these terms may have more specific or technical meaning in the same contexts in the other dialect.
Cultural heritage is unique, irreplaceable and beautiful which places the responsibility of preservation on the current generation. Smaller objects such as artworks and other cultural masterpieces are collected in museums and art galleries. Grass Roots organizations and political groups, such as the international body UNESCO, have been successful at gaining the necessary support to preserve the heritage of many nations for the future generations to cherish.

The ethics and rationale of cultural preservation

Objects are a part of the study of human history because they provide a concrete basis for ideas, and can validate them. Their preservation demonstrates a recognition of the necessity of the past and of the things that tell its story. In The Past is a Foreign Country, David Lowenthal observes that preserved objects also validate memories.  While digital acquisition techniques can provide a technological solution that is able to acquire the shape and the appearance of artifacts with an unprecedented precision in human history, the actuality of the object, as opposed to a reproduction, draws people in and gives them a literal way of touching the past. This unfortunately poses a danger as places and things are damaged by the hands of tourists, the light required to display them, and other risks of making an object known and available. The reality of this risk reinforces the fact that all artifacts are in a constant state of chemical transformation, so that what is considered to be preserved is actually changing – it is never as it once was. Similarly changing is the value each generation may place on the past and on the artifacts that link it to the past.
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Kautilya Society in Varanasi- When heritage protection become
Classical civilizations, and especially the Indian, have attributed supreme importance to the preservation of tradition. Its central idea was that social institutions, scientific knowledge and technological applications need to use a "heritage" as a "resource". Using contemporary language, we could say that ancient Indians considered, as social resources, both economic assets (like natural resources and their exploitation structure) and factors promoting social integration (like institutions for the preservation of knowledge and for the maintenance of civil order). Ethics considered that what had been inherited should not be consumed, but should be handed over, possibly enriched, to successive generations. This was a moral imperative for all, except in the final life stage of sannyasa. 
What one generation considers "cultural heritage" may be rejected by the next generation, only to be revived by a subsequent generation.

Types of heritage

Cultural property
Classical Ruins by Hubert Robert 1798. Elements of tangible culture depicted include the ruins of the obelisk (foreground) and the pyramids (background).

Cultural Property includes the physical, or "tangible" cultural heritage, such as works of art. These are generally split into two groups of moveable and immoveable heritage. Immoveable heritage includes buildings (which themselves may include installed art such as organs, stained-glass windows, and frescoes), large industrial installations or other historic places and monuments. Moveable heritage includes books, documents, moveable artworks, machines, clothing, and other artifacts, that are considered worthy of preservation for the future. These include objects significant to the archaeology, architecture, science or technology of a specific culture.

Intangible culture

The Grandfather Tells A Story, by Albert Anker, ca. 1884. Elements of intangible culture depicted here include storytelling (oral culture), foodways, tool-use and crafts, in addition to material culture such as architecture

"Intangible cultural heritage" consists of non-physical aspects of a particular culture, often maintained by social customs during a specific period in history. The ways and means of behavior in a society, and the often formal rules for operating in a particular cultural climate. These include social values and traditions, customs and  practices, aesthic and spiritual beliefs, artistic expressions, language and other aspects of human activity. The significance of physical artifacts can be interpreted against the backdrop of socioeconomic, political, ethnic, religious and philosophical values of a particular group of people. Naturally, intangible cultural heritage is more difficult to preserve than physical objects.
Aspects of the preservation and conservation of cultural intangibles include:
  • Folklore
  • Oral History
  • Language preservation

Natural heritage


"Natural Heritage" is also an important part of a society's heritage, encompassing the countryside and natural environment, including flora and fauna scientifically known as biodiversity, as well as geological elements (including mineralogical, geomorphological, paleontological, etc.), scientifically known as geodiversity These kind of heritage sites often serve as an important component in a country's tourist industry, attracting many visitors from abroad as well as locally. Heritage can also include cultural landscapes (natural features that may have cultural attributes).
Aspects of the preservation and conservation of natural heritage include:
  •  Ethnobotany
  • Rare Breeds Conservation
  • Heirloom Plants

World heritage movement

Plaque stating the designation of Carthage as a World Heritage Site.
Significant was the Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage that was adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO in 1972. As of 2011, there are 936 World Heritage Sites: 725 cultural, 183 natural, and 28 mixed properties, in 153 countries. Each of these sites is considered important to the international community.
The underwater cultural heritage is protected by the UNESCO protection and prevention of underwater cultural history This convention is a legal instrument helping states parties to improve the protection of their underwater cultural heritage.
In additional, UNESCO has begun designating. Masterpieces of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity. The Committee on economic, Social and cultural rights, sitting as part of the United Nations Economic and Social Council with article 15 of its Covenant had sought to instill the principles under which cultural heritage is protected as part of a basic human right.

Cultural deprivation

Cultural deprivation is a theory in sociology that claims that members of the working class cannot easily acquire cultural capital hampering their access to education and upward social mobility
Proponents of this theory argue that working class culture (regardless of race, gender, ethnicity or other factors) inherently differs from that of people in the middle class. This difference in culture means that while middle-class children can easily acquire cultural capital by observing their parents, working-class children cannot, and this deprivation is self-perpetuating.
The theory claims that the middle class gains cultural capital as the result of primary socialization, while the working class does not. Cultural capital helps the middle class succeed society because their norms and values facilitate educational achievement and subsequent employability. Working class members of society that lack cultural capital do not pass it on to their children, reproducing the class system. Middle class children's culture capital allows them to communicate with their middle class teachers more effectively than working class children which contributes to social inequality.
Bordieu claimed that state schools are set up to make everybody middle class, although only the middle class and some high achieving working class have the cultural capital to achieve this. From a  Marxist perspective cultural deprivation observes that the resources available to the working class are limited, and that working class children enter school less-well prepared than others.