About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

The Constitutional Right to the "Pursuit of Happiness" Denied to Adopted Children and Adult Adoptees

ADOPTEE RAGE!

The Constitutional Right to the "Pursuit of Happiness"
Denied to Adopted Children and Adult Adoptee's
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The abandoned adopted child is subjected to an unfortunate life that is increasingly psychologically traumatizing through childhood. The series of unfortunate events prior to the prolonged antagonizing discontinuity and subjective experience of being marooned in a family of strangers with growing contempt over time, mounting conditional disregard for the ostracized child.
The compounding psychological damages to the abandoned adopted child's psyche begin to consume the child's barely existent ego and eventually devour the child's ego. What emerges is a falsely perceived persona that in actuality is a defense mechanism for psychological survival. The survival coping mechanisms enable the adopted child to be perceived as agreeable, compliant and not a threat to the dominating forces that condemn the illegitimate bastard child's right of autonomy to a lower social class that is worthy of servitude.         In this social perception and utilization of social class system begins with an individual's birthright, status and place in society, that the adopted child lacks and is not part of the social system of the society. The illegitimate bastard child is negatively regarded by society. 
A small percentage of society that uses adoption to procure a child will raise the child in denial of the child's low class and illegitimacy and assume the child is worthy of the standards of the family's social class, love and nurturing the adopted child void of adopted child's maltreatment and abuse. The denial group bases the affiliation with the adopted child on 
the ultimate potential and best interest of the child.

Unlike the denial group, the strict social allegiance group of adopting parents adopted the child for the specific purpose and reason for the child to fulfill the needs of the parents. The temporary needs, wants, whims and desires. The psychologically dysfunctional relationship with the child, is that the own him and he will be grateful. The adoption purpose is a temporary cover-up for the wound, injury, void and lacking in the adoptive parent. The abusive adoptive parent believes the "child born in sin" has a sinful nature and must be broken to submit to the parent. The adoptive parent see's the adoptive child as repulsive, contemptuous and resentful of the adoptive parents who saved the child from his own life. The adoptive parent's view of the adopted child in condemnation that the "untouchable class" illegitimate child has bad genetics and should not reproduce. The abandoned at birth child Is socially perceived as damaged, socially repulsive nature, behavior and future of welfare and mental service dependency. The abandoned child is unworthy of the civilized educated class system within society. 
The society that is repulsed by abandoned, homeless children, Is the same society that offers, utilizes, and profits from this socially charitable solution to the problem of abandoned, unwanted children. The social perception of abandoned children is a burden to, and on, the contributing public that promotes the solution of adoption to deal with the problem of unwanted children in favorable positive image. The Christian church uses and utilizes adoption to promote religious doctrine and creates and perpetuates the concept illegitimacy of children from unmarried parents, propagated by fear, guilt and damnation.
The public and religious sentiment condemns the pregnant unmarried woman as a whore. the complete and total disregard of the illegitimate adopted child, can be nothing more than gratefully silent., The public and religious sentiment toward adoption give commendable morally awards and hold a higher charitable standard to the adopting parents, that have taken into their home the evil child born of sin to convert into a compliant submissive Christian follower. The general public consensus views child adoption in strictly positive regard and refuses to acknowledge any negative aspects, only accepting adoption as saving children from their own lives.
Birth mothers and their child are the menacing force, essentially villains that threaten and intimidate the wholesome institution of adoption charity. Adoption   charity marketing, selling buying, perpetuation and promotion of the adoption principle as the solution to a sinister problem of premarital sex that produces a secondary problem unwanted sinful children. The negative public sentiment toward adopted child, and later the adult adoptee is expected to remain silent, submissive and grateful without exception. The cultural disregard of adopted child and especially the adult adoptee are not given the constitutional rights of the population, due to the discrimination of being abandoned adopted in childhood the adult adoptee can not live with the same degree for self regard as the majority of the population that takes identity for granted. The psychological compromised childhood and negative social regard of adoptees keeps the adoptee from self regard, esteem and actualization,
negative, conditional existence and compromised self regard in childhood by the abandonment from genetic mother, sale, exchange and placement to being owned through adoption for a specific and particular purpose to the adopting parents. Without the recognition of the truth in social regard adopted children will forever live as being owned, enslaved and in servitude of debt that can never be repaid to the adoptive parents that own our lives. 
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Self-actualization is a term that has been used in various psychology theories, often in slightly different ways. The term was originally introduced by the organismic theorist Kurt Goldstein for the motive to realize one's full potential. Expressing one's creativity, quest for spiritual enlightenment, pursuit of knowledge, and the desire to give to society are examples of self-actualization. In Goldstein's view, it is the organism's master motive, the only real motive: "the tendency to actualize itself as fully as possible is the basic drive... the drive of self-actualization.  Carl Roger's similarly wrote of "the curative force in psychotherapy - man's tendency to actualize himself, to become his potentialities... to express and activate all the capacities of the organism. The concept was brought most fully to prominence in Abraham Maslows Hierarchy of Needs theory as the final level of psychological development that can be achieved when all basic and mental needs are essentially fulfilled and the "actualization" of the full personal potential takes place, although he adapted this viewpoint later on in life, and saw it more flexibly. Self-actualization can be seen as similar to words and concepts such as self-discovery, self-reflection, self-realisation and self exploration.
As Abraham Maslow noted, the basic needs of humans must be met (e.g. food, shelter, warmth, security, sense of belongingness etc.) before a person can achieve self-actualization - the need to be good, to be fully alive and to find meaning in life. Research shows that when people live lives that are different from their true nature and capabilities, they are less likely to be happy than those whose goals and lives match. For example, someone who has inherent potential to be a great artist or teacher may never realize his/her talents if their energy is focused on attaining the basic needs of humans

In Goldstein's theory

Kurt Goldstein's book The Organism: A Holistic Approach to Biology Derived from Pathological Data in Man (1939), presented self-actualization as "the tendency to actualize, as much as possible, [the organism's] individual capacities" in the world. The tendency toward self-actualization is "the only drive by which the life of an organism is determined". However, for Goldstein self-actualization cannot be understood as a kind of goal to be reached sometime in the future. At any moment the organism has the fundamental tendency to actualize all its capacities, its whole potential, as it is present in exactly that moment, and in exactly that situation in contact with the world under the given circumstances. Under the influence of Goldstein, Abraham Maslow developed a hierarchical theory of human motivation in Motivation and Personality (1954).

Maslow's hierarchy of needs


Abraham Maslow's book Motivation and Personality started a philosophical revolution out of which grew humanistic psychology. This changed the view of human nature from a negative point of view - man is a conditioned or tension reducing organism- to a more positive view in which man is motivated to realize his full potential. This is reflected in his hierarchy of needs and in his theory of Self-actualization.
The term was later used by Abraham Maslow in his article, A Theory of Human Motivation, Maslow explicitly defines self-actualization to be "the desire for self-fulfillment, namely the tendency for him [the individual] to become actualized in what he is potentially. This tendency might be phrased as the desire to become more and more what one is, to become everything that one is capable of becoming. Maslow used the term self-actualization to describe a desire, not a driving force, that could lead to realizing one's capabilities. Maslow did not feel that self-actualization determined one's life; rather, he felt that it gave the individual a desire, or motivation to achieve budding ambitions. Maslow's usage of the term is now popular in modern psychology when discussing personality from the humanistic approach.
A basic definition from a typical college textbook defines self-actualization according to Maslow simply as "the full realization of one's potential", and of one's 'true self'.
A more explicit definition of self-actualization according to Maslow is "intrinsic growth of what is already in the organism, or more accurately of what is the organism itself...self-actualization is growth-motivated rather than deficiency-motivated. This explanation emphasizes the fact that self-actualization cannot normally be reached until other lower order necessities of Maslow's hierarchy of needs are satisfied. While Goldstein defined self-actualization as a driving force, Maslow uses the term to describe personal growth that takes place once lower order needs have essentially been met, one corollary being that, in his opinion, "self-actualisation...rarely happens...certainly in less than 1% of the adult population. The fact that "most of us function most of the time on a level lower than that of self-actualization" he called the psychopathology of normality.
Maslow considered self-actualizing people to possess "an unusual ability to detect the spurious, the fake, and the dishonest in personality, and in general to judge the people correctly and efficiently.
Maslow based his theory partially on his own assumptions or convictions about human potential and partially on his case studies of historical figures whom he believed to be self-actualized, including Albert Einstein and Henry David Thoreau. Maslow examined the lives of each of these people in order to assess the common qualities that led each to become self-actualized. In general he found that these individuals were very accepting of themselves and of their life circumstances; were focused on finding solutions to cultural problems rather than to personal problems; were open to others' opinions and ideas; had strong senses of privacy, autonomy, human values and appreciation of life; and a few intimate friendships rather than many superficial ones. He also believed that each of these people had somehow managed to find their core-nature that is unique to them, and is one of the true goals of life.

Maslow's characteristics of self-actualizers

self-actualizer is a person who is living creatively and fully using his or her potentials. What a man can do, he must do. It refers to the desire for self-fulfillment, namely, to the tendency for him to become actualized in what he is potentially. While the theory is generally portrayed as a fairly rigid hierarchy, Maslow noted that the order in which these needs are fulfilled does not always follow this standard progression. For example, he notes that for some individuals, the need for self-esteem is more important than the need for love. For others, the need for creative fulfillment may supersede even the most basic needs.  In his studies, Maslow found that self-actualizers share similarities. Whether famous or unknown, educated or not, rich or poor, self-actualizers tend to fit the following profile.
Maslow's self-actualizing characteristics
  • Efficient perceptions of reality. Self-actualizers are able to judge situations correctly and honestly. They are very sensitive to the fake and dishonest, and are free to see reality 'as it is'.
  • Comfortable acceptance of self, others, nature. Self-actualizers accept their own human nature with all its flaws. The shortcomings of others and the contradictions of the human condition are accepted with humor and tolerance.
  • Reliant on own experiences and judgement. Independent, not reliant on culture and environment to form opinions and views.
  • Spontaneous and natural. True to oneself, rather than being how others want.
  • Task centering. Most of Maslow's subjects had a mission to fulfill in life or some task or problem ‘beyond’ themselves (instead of outside of themselves) to pursue. Humanitarians such as  Albert Schweitzer and Mother Teresa are considered to have possessed this quality.
  • Autonomy. Self-actualizers are free from reliance on external authorities or other people. They tend to be resourceful and independent.
  • Continued freshness of appreciation. The self-actualizer seems to constantly renew appreciation of life's basic goods. A sunset or a flower will be experienced as intensely time after time as it was at first. There is an "innocence of vision", like that of an artist or child.
  • Profound interpersonal relationships. The interpersonal relationships of self-actualizers are marked by deep loving bonds.
  • Comfort with solitude. Despite their satisfying relationships with others, self-actualizing persons value solitude and are comfortable being alone.
  • Non-hostile sense of humor. This refers to the ability to laugh at oneself.
  • Peak experiences. All of Maslow's subjects reported the frequent occurrence of peak experiences (temporary moments of self-actualization). These occasions were marked by feelings of ecstasy, harmony, and deep meaning. Self-actualizers reported feeling at one with the universe, stronger and calmer than ever before, filled with light, beautiful and good, and so forth.
  • Socially compassionate. Possessing humanity.
  • Few friends. Few close intimate friends rather than many surface relationships.
In summary, self-actualizers feel finally themselves, safe, not anxious, accepted, loved, loving, and alive, certainly living a fulfilling life. Additionally, Schott (see also: Schott, R.L. (1992). Abraham Maslow, Humanistic Psychology and Organization Leadership: A Jungian Perspective."Journal of Humanistic Psychology", 32 (1), 106-120) discussed in connection with transpersonal business studies
Instead of focusing on what goes wrong with people, Maslow wanted to focus on human potential, and how we fulfill that potential. Maslow (1943, 1954) stated that human motivation is based on people seeking fulfillment and change through personal growth. Self-actualized people as those who were fulfilled and doing all they were capable of. It refers to the person’s desire for self-fulfillment, namely, to the tendency for him to become actualized in what he is potentially. "The specific form that these needs will take will of course vary greatly from person to person. In one individual it may take the form of the desire to be an ideal mother, in another it may be expressed athletically, and in still another it may be expressed in painting pictures or in inventions." (Maslow, 1943, pp. 382–383)
Self-actualization can be reached by any particular individual, no matter who you are. People living in poverty also achieved self-actualization. Through examinations, it is concluded that people living in poverty are still capable of higher-order needs such as love and belongingness. No matter who you are, you can achieve self-actualization. 

In psychology

Self-actualization is at the top of Maslow's hierarchy of needs becoming '"fully human"...maturity or self-actualization and is considered a part of the humanistic approach to personality. Humanistic psychology is one of several methods used in psychology for studying, understanding, and evaluating personality. The humanistic approach was developed because other approaches, such as the psychodynamic approach made famous by Sigmund Freud focused on unhealthy individuals that exhibited disturbed behavior; whereas the humanistic approach focuses on healthy, motivated people and tries to determine how they define the self while maximizing their potential.
Stemming from this branch of psychology is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. According to Maslow, people have lower order needs that in general must be fulfilled before high order needs can be satisfied: 'five sets of needs - physiological, safety, belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization'.
As a person moves up Maslow's hierarchy of needs, eventually they may find themselves reaching the summit — self-actualization. Maslow's hierarchy of needs begins with the most basic necessities deemed "the physiological needs" in which the individual will seek out items like food and water, and must be able to perform basic functions such as breathing and sleeping. Once these needs have been met, a person can move on to fulfilling "the safety needs", where they will attempt to obtain a sense of security physical comforts and shelter, employment, and property. The next level is "the belongingness and love needs", where people will strive for social acceptance, affiliations, a sense of belongingness and being welcome, sexual intimacy, and perhaps a family. Next are "the esteem needs", where the individual will desire a sense of competence recognition of achievement by peers, and respect from others.
Some argue that once these needs are met, an individual is primed for self-actualization. Others maintain that there are two more phases an individual must progress through before self-actualization can take place. These include "the cognitive needs", where a person will desire knowledge and an understanding of the world around them, and "the aesthetic needs" which include a need for "symmetry, order, and beauty. Once all these needs have been satisfied, the final stage of Maslow's hierarchy—self actualization—can take place.
 Classical Adlerian psychotherapy promotes this level of psychological development, utilizing the foundation of a 12-stage therapeutic model to realistically satisfy the basic needs, leading to an advanced stage of "meta-therapy," creative living, and self/other/task-actualization Gestalt theory, acknowledging that 'Kurt Goldstein first introduced the concept of the organism as a whole ', built on the assumption that "every individual, every plant, every animal has only one inborn goal - to actualize itself as it is.
Maslow's writings are used as inspirational resources. The key to Maslow's writings is understanding that there are no quick routes to becoming self-actualizing: rather it is predicated on the individual having their lower deficiency needs met. Once a person has moved through feeling and believing that they are deficient, they naturally seek to grow into who they are, that is self-actualize. Elsewhere, however, Maslow (2011) and Carl Rogers (1980) both suggested necessary attitudes and/or attributes that need to be inside an individual as a pre-requisite for self-actualization. Amongst these, are: a real wish to be themselves, to be fully human, to fulfil themselves, to be completely alive, as well as to risk being vulnerable, and uncovering more 'painful' aspects in order to learn about/grow through and integrate these parts of themselves (which has parallels with Jung’s slightly similar concept of individuation).
Although initially being biologically-centered (or focused around the more ordinary, psychological self-nature), both Maslow (2011) and Rogers (1980) became more open to 'spirituality' and grew to accept a more open and ‘spiritual’ conception of man before the end of their lives. Also, there have been many similarities and cross-references between various spiritual schools or groups (particularly Eastern spiritual ways) in the past 40 years. One can also suggest that Sri Ramana Maharshi’s description, that complete and spiritual self-realisation is characterized by 'Being' (sat), 'Consciousness' (chit) and 'Bliss' (Ananda), is a reflection of humanistic thinking or experience; that the experience of a self-actualizing person partakes in these things to some degree: 'beingness,' 'awareness,' and a 'meaningful happiness,' even if one can go further than mere self-actualization into Self-transcendence, where Being-Consciousness-Bliss fully form.

Self-actualization

Self-actualization is a term that has been used in various psychology theories, often in slightly different ways. The term was originally introduced by the Organismic theorist Kurt Goldstein for the motive to realize one's full potential. Expressing one's creativity, quest for spiritual enlightenment, pursuit of knowledge, and the desire to give to society are examples of self-actualization. In Goldstein's view, it is the organism's master motive, the only real motive: "the tendency to actualize itself as fully as possible is the basic drive... the drive of self-actualization. Carl Rogers, similarly wrote of "the curative force in psychotherapy - man's tendency to actualize himself, to become his potentialities... to express and activate all the capacities of the organism. The concept was brought most fully to prominence in Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs theory as the final level of psychological development that can be achieved when all basic and mental needs are essentially fulfilled and the "actualization" of the full personal potential takes place, although he adapted this viewpoint later on in life, and saw it more flexibly. Self-actualization can be seen as similar to words and concepts such as self-discovery, self-reflection, self-realisation and self exploration.
As Abraham Maslow noted, the basic needs of humans must be met (e.g. food, shelter, warmth, security, sense of belongingness etc.) before a person can achieve self-actualization - the need to be good, to be fully alive and to find meaning in life. Research shows that when people live lives that are different from their true nature and capabilities, they are less likely to be happy than those whose goals and lives match. For example, someone who has inherent potential to be a great artist or teacher may never realize his/her talents if their energy is focused on attaining the basic needs of humans

Personal fulfillment

Personal fulfilment is achievement of life goals which are important to an individual, in contrast to the goals of family, society and other collective obligations.
Personal fulfilment is an ongoing journey for a human individual. It commences when an individual starts becoming conscious of oneself & one's surroundings. It is then that one's exploration begins to realise what one is capable of. Like the tentative steps of a child that invariably leads to a few falls followed by seeking for some help from people around. Then the joy of achievement when one can successfully take a few steps without falling. The appreciation of people around is a key component of achieving personal fulfilment. It is invariably followed by a sense of habituality (i.e. being able to perform any act e.g. walking, habitually). Then boredom. Followed by a yearning for the next horizon, whatever it may be for an individual.
Key components then of personal fulfilment are:
  1. Consciousness - of oneself & the environment
  2. Consciousness - of people around oneself
  3. Exploration - of something new that one may be capable of
  4. Initial failure - as one's initial attempts at exploration leads to stumbles & falls
  5. Trying - again & again till such time that one does not stumble & fall
  6. Experiencing joy - of having tried & achieved something new
  7. Commendation & applause - of those around; especially of the ones that the individual values
  8. Boredom - as one performs the 'not so new anymore' task as a matter of habit
  9. Then back to step 3 for something new to explore
  10. The cycle continuing throughout one's life as the individual grows & expands into newer & unexplored dimensions of personal fulfilment
Consciousness is the quality or state of being aware of an external object or something within oneself. It has been defined as: sentience,awareness, subjectivity, the ability to experience or to feel, wakefulness, having a sense of selfhood, and the executive control system of the mind.
Consciousness of the self is a complex experience for an individual being. A prime aspect of consciousness and awareness of the self is the awakening to one's capabilities & potential. The awakening to one's capabilities & potential is a continuous process throughout the period of existence of a being - from the birth of the physical being through the expiration of the same. Inherent to this process of being is a drive or a force that seems t be part & parcel of being in the physical being on earth. This drive manifests itself from the start of one's being - like a child crying as soon as it is born. It is the awakening of the child to its capabilities of exercising its vocal chords. The drive continues through the life of one's being (albeit in varying degrees of forcefulnes & momentum at various points in time) through to death of the physical being as we know. This drive is primal & is the single force that leads to exploration.

Self-fulfillment

Self-fulfillment is a concept used in philosophy and, to a lesser degree, psychology, referring to the realizing of one's deepest desires and capacities. The history of this concept can be traced to Ancient Greek philosophers, and although it has been criticized since, it still remains a notable concept in modern philosophy.

Definition and history

Philosopher Alan Gewirth in his book Self-Fulfillment defined self-fulfillment as "carrying to fruition one's deepest desires or one's worthiest capacities. Another definition states that self-fulfillment is "the attainment of a satisfying and worthwhile life well lived. It is an ideal that can be traced to Ancient Greek philosophers, and one that has been common and popular in both Western and non-Western cultures. Self-fulfillment is often seen as superior to other values and goals.
Gewirth notes that "to seek for a good human life is to seek for self-fulfillment. However, in modern philosophy, the ideal of self-fulfillment has become less popular, criticized by thinkers such as Hobbes and Freud, who feel there are conceptual and moral problems associated with it. It has been called an egotistic concept, impossible to achieve, with some suggesting that it is an obsolete concept that should be abandoned. Moral philosophers focus less on obtaining a good life, and more on interpersonal relations and duties owed to others. Similarly, whereas Plato and Aristotle saw the goal of the polis in providing a means of self-fulfillment to citizens, modern governments have given up on that, focusing rather on maintaining civic order Despite the criticism, the concept of self-fulfillment still persists in modern philosophy, its usefulness defended by thinkers such as Gewirth himself.
Gewirth noted that the term self-fulfillment has two near synonyms: self realization and self-actualization, used respectively by philosophers and humanist psychologists, whereas the term self-fulfillment is more commonly used outside those expert fields. Gewirth however argues that this concept is sufficiently different from those others to merit not being used as a synonym. Self-actualization in particular, often discussed in the context of Maslow's hierarchy of needs is frequently defined as the "need for self-fulfillment.
Self-fulfillment has been positively connected to altruism