About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Saturday, February 22, 2014

The Suicide Risk In Adopted Children Swedish Study

ADOPTEE RAGE!

The Suicide Risk In Adopted Children Swedish Study
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One problem with this study is that it is solely based Swedish Adoption, The country is excessively progressed multiple decades beyond the infantile United States. In countries such as Sweden, programs are in place to provide assistance to families, dignified regard for the general welfare of all of it's citizens and the general mentality of Swedish citizens are far superior in terms of equality, education, social welfare of families and the obvious lack of poverty, crime and lack of child abuse in general. Far above the low standards of American materialism, greed and the selfish nature of the average American citizen. When we compare apples to oranges Sweden's lack of disparity and the United States plethora of poverty, crime and child abuse the two countries are not comparable in the least. Maybe the data could be used for a future study as the control group.  

Genetics and childhood environment together contribute to risk for suicide attempts

  • Wilcox, H. C., Kuramoto, S., Brent, D., & Runeson, B. (2012). The interaction of parental history of suicidal behavior and exposure to adoptive parents' psychiatric disorders on adoptee suicide attempt hospitalizations. Am J Psychiatry, 169(3), 309-315.
Abstract: This pilot study is designed to compare the relative impact of genetic vulnerability versus aspects of family environment (adoptive parent psychiatric disorder, suicidal behaviors and criminal convictions). The study will do this by using a Swedish database that consists of all births in Sweden since 1931. The database has all offspring linked with their biological and adoptive parents by a unique personal identification number each Swede is assigned at birth. The study is focused on identifying which aspects of the family environment enhance or reduce risk to offspring of birth parents who took their lives to suicide or attempted suicide; and whether this risk is conferred by genetic or environmental factors or an interaction between the two. The grant will allow the investigators to begin to disentangle the effects of genetic risk from the impact of the environment on vulnerability and resilience among offspring at high genetic risk for suicidal behaviors.
Using her Pilot Research Grant and 30 years of data from the national Swedish registry, Dr. Wilcox’s innovative study set out to study the relative impact of genetic and environmental risk factors on suicidal behaviors in adopted children.  She looked at adoptees’ risk for suicidal behavior based on the suicidal behavior in biological parents as well as psychiatric hospitalizations in adoptive mothers. The study showed that parental history of suicidal behaviors and adoptive mother’s psychiatric hospitalizations, in combination, contributed to adoptee’s risk for suicidal behavior. The relative risk of suicide attempts in the study’s adoptees whose biological parents had suicidal behavior, as compared to offspring of parents with psychiatric hospitalizations but no suicidal behaviors, was four times higher only if their adoptive mother had been psychiatrically hospitalized.  There was no difference based solely on family history or adoptive mother’s psychiatric hospitalizations.
Dr. Holly Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Mental Health.   In addition to her Pilot grant, she currently holds a Young Investigator Grant from AFSP that studies early trauma, biological stress response, and suicide attempts among individuals at high risk for depression. Click here to read more about Dr. Wilcox's Pilot Research Grant.






Dr. Holly Wilcox is an Assistant Professor in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Mental Health.   In addition to her Pilot grant, she currently holds a Young Investigator Grant from AFSP that studies early trauma, biological stress response, and suicide attempts among individuals at high risk for depression. Click here to read more about Dr. Wilcox's Pilot Research Grant.