About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Adoptee's Self Awareness through Factual Based Learning

ADOPTEE RAGE!
Adoptee's Find Self Awareness through Fact Based learning
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Adult Adoptee Education is the self propelled search for answers
relating to the nature of the dysfunctional adoptive family drama circus, that cost each adoptee their healthy normal childhoods and a psychological compromised adulthood and/or psychopathic status, the gift that keeps on taking....
By learning the basic principles mapped out in Psychology and sociology, theories of behaviors, the cause and effect of child adoption and how in particular the specific impact and the peculiar circumstances specific to each adoptee is unique. Finding a therapist specializing in adopted children. Mapping out childhood maltreatment, sexual and physical abuse, and acknowledging what has occurred as injustice, maltreatment and psychological abuse and allowing our psyche, ego and emotionally deal with the unexpressed emotions from childhood that negatively effect today.  our  we can begin to sift through and separate what is genuine and true and real about ourselves, and what is a leftover effect of "coping and defense mechanisms are not part of our personality". With each piece we find un-corrupted self awareness as we fit the fragments of ourselves together we begin to form a shape of who we might become.
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Topic "Idealization and Devaluation"
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In psychoanalytic theory, observation and behavior,
 when an individual is unable to integrate difficult feelings, specific defenses are mobilized to overcome what the individual perceives as an unbearable situation. The defense that helps in this process is called splitting. Splitting is the tendency to view events or people as either all bad or all good. 
When viewing people as "all good", the individual is said to be using the defense mechanism idealization: a mental mechanism in which the person attributes exaggeratedly positive qualities to the self or others. 
When viewing people as "all bad", the individual employs devaluation: attributing exaggeratedly negative qualities to the self or others.


In child development, idealization and devaluation are quite normal. During the childhood development stage, individuals become capable of perceiving others as complex structures, containing both good and bad components. 
If the development stage is interrupted (by early childhood trauma, for example), these defense mechanisms may persist into adulthood.
 
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Topic: "Spillover In Family Conflict"

Spillover concerns the transmission of states of well-being or emotional 
distress from one domain of life to another. This is a process that takes place      at the intra-individual level, thus within one person but across different domains
such as work or group activity. The experiences that are transferred from one domain to the other ( a person's problems with relationships at work come with him and manifest in problem relationships at home) can be either negative, or positive.

Work-family conflict: negative spillover

Spillover effects apply to situations in which there is a form of inter-role conflict. That is, being involved in a work-role conflict may put strains on the family role, or vice versa . This implies that an additional categorization can be made between two different types of inter-role conflict. Firstly, work family conflict (WFC) refers to a situation where the pressures related to the work-role have an unfavorable impact on the family role. Second, family work conflict (FWC) refers to a situation where the pressures of the family role have an unfavorable impact on the role individuals have at work. An example of a (WFC-) spillover effect would be one in which an individual experiences a need to compromise on leisure time (i.e. private domain) due to work overload (i.e. work domain). Up till now, numerous studies have found evidence for spillover effects.

Predicting negative spillover

Both dispositional variables (e.g.,Type A personality, negative affectivity, as well as work characteristics have been shown to play a role in work-family conflict. Different job demands have been shown to predict WFC, including work-role overload and work pressure, but also an unfavorable working time schedule and emotional job demands.

Work-family enrichment/facilitation: positive spillover

Apart from the hampering, negative effects of WFC/FWC-conflicts, positive effects may also occur. This process is called work family enrichment or facilitation.

Predicting positive spillover

Research has shown that, in general, positive spillover is positively related to job resources (e.g., social support, autonomy, feedback). Also, positive spillover has been related positively to job performance and other outcomes.

Explaining spillover

One theoretical framework that has been used to explain negative spillover is called the role scarcity hypothesis. The main argument here is that since people have a limited, fixed amount of resources (e.g., energy, time), problems may arise when different roles draw on these same resources. For example, when both family and work roles draw on the scarce resource of time, it is likely that one of these roles is compromised due to a lack of available time. A different framework, the role expansion hypothesis, has been used to explain positive spillover. According to this hypothesis, individuals generate resources (e.g., positive mood, skills) and opportunities from the multiple roles they are engaged in. These, in turn, can be used in both life domains to improve functioning and promote growth.

Crossover

In the process of crossover, transmission of states of well-being takes place between closely related persons. This process is characterized by transmission on the inter-individual level (Bakker, Demerouti & Burke, 2009). In other words, crossover is a dyadic process where states of well-being ‘cross over’ to another individual. Research has shown that this process can entail both the transfer of negative, as well as positive experiences. An example of a crossover effect would be one in which an individual transfers feelings of stress, fatigue to his/her partner. Research studies have shown this effect to occur between partners. For example, a study by Demerouti, Bakker and Schaufeli indicated that partners of employees suffering from burnout may actually develop burnout themselves.

Predicting crossover

Explaining spillover

One theoretical framework that has been used to explain negative spillover is called the role scarcity hypothesis. The main argument here is that since people have a limited, fixed amount of resources (e.g., energy, time), problems may arise when different roles draw on these same resources. For example, when both family and work roles draw on the scarce resource of time, it is likely that one of these roles is compromised due to a lack of available time. A different framework, the role expansion hypothesis, has been used to explain positive spillover. According to this hypothesis, individuals generate resources (e.g., positive mood, skills) and opportunities from the multiple roles they are engaged in. These, in turn, can be used in both life domains to improve functioning and promote growth.

Crossover

In the process of crossover, transmission of states of well-being takes place between closely related persons. This process is characterized by transmission on the inter-individual level (Bakker, Demerouti & Burke, 2009). In other words, crossover is a dyadic process where states of well-being ‘cross over’ to another individual. Research has shown that this process can entail both the transfer of negative, as well as positive experiences. An example of a crossover effect would be one in which an individual transfers feelings of stress or fatigue to his/her partner. Research studies have shown this effect to occur between partners. For example, a study by Demerouti, Bakker and Schaufeli  indicated that partners of employees suffering from burnout may actually develop burnout themselves.

Predicting crossover

It has been shown that crossover is more likely to occur in situations where individuals play close attention to others. Also, crossover is more likely when individuals have self-construals that are focused on being interrelated to others, rather than being unique and independent. Sensitivity and susceptability to emotional stimuli may also predict crossover.

Explaining crossover

Emphatic processes, common stressors and communication/interaction have been identified (by Westman) as potential mechanisms explaining the crossover effect. Through empathetic processes, partners become aware of the affective states of the other and are affected by them. Common stressors, such as financial pressures, may increase strain experienced by both partners. Finally, transmission of states of well-being may be mediated by interaction and communication, such as social undermining or a lack of social support.

Combining spillover and crossover: The Spillover-Crossover model

In the Spillover-Crossover model (SCM), research and theories on spillover and crossover are combined, resulting in a model that proposes the following: first, experiences in the work domain spill over to the family domain. Consequently, through social interaction, the experiences cross over from one partner to the other. As explained in the previous sections, this process can concern both positive and negative experiences. Various studies have yielded results that support the SCM. Yet, these research efforts are largely devoted to studying negative spillover and crossover. One example is the study of Bakker, Demerouti and Dollard, showing that work roles interfered with family roles when work overload and emotional demands increased. In turn, the intimate partner experienced a higher level of demands at home (e.g., overload of household tasks), as a result of the negative behaviors of the employee. In the end, the partner experienced higher levels of exhaustion.