About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Friday, January 10, 2014

Mental Health Dysfunction of Infertility

ADOPTEE RAGE!

Mental Health Dysfunction of Infertility
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Harvard Mental Health Newsletter

psychological challenges faced by the roughly 1.3 million couples who seek infertility advice or treatment each year in the United States, reports the May 2009 issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter.
Although the causes of infertility are overwhelmingly physiological, the resulting heartache may exact a huge psychological toll. Individuals who learn they are infertile often experience the distressing emotions common to those who are grieving a loss. Typical reactions include depression, anger, and frustration.
Relationships may suffer—not only with the spouse/partner, but also with friends and family members. Couples dealing with infertility may avoid social interaction and may struggle with anxiety-related sexual dysfunction and other marital conflicts.

While treatments for infertility offer much-needed help and hope, 
"they may actually heighten stress and anxiety". Additionally, drugs and hormones used to treat infertility may cause psychological side effects, and their costs are significant. Only 15 states mandate insurance coverage, and the extent varies.


Many individuals find a way to cope on their own, or they seek support from friends, family, or support groups, notes Dr. Michael Miller, editor in chief of theHarvard Mental Health Letter. But others need additional help such as counseling, psychotherapy, relaxation techniques, or medications. Although the psychological challenges of infertility can be overwhelming, most people struggling with it ultimately reach some type of resolution,
 But that resolution is usually hard won.

often exacerbated by the physical and emotional rigors of infertility treatment — may exact a huge psychological toll. One study of 200 couples seen consecutively at a fertility clinic, for example, found that half of the women and 15% of the men said that infertility was the most upsetting experience of their lives. Another study of 488 American women who filled out a standard psychological questionnaire before undergoing a stress reduction program concluded that women with infertility felt as anxious or depressed as those diagnosed with cancer, hypertension, or recovering from a heart attack.

Stress of infertility and interventions

Individuals who learn they are infertile often experience the normal but nevertheless distressing emotions common to those who are grieving any significant loss — in this case the ability to procreate. Typical reactions include shock, grief, depression, anger, and frustration, as well as loss of self-esteem, self-confidence, and a sense of control over one's destiny.
Relationships may suffer — not only the primary relationship with a spouse or partner, but also those with friends and family members who may inadvertently cause pain by offering well-meaning but misguided opinions and advice. Couples dealing with infertility may avoid social interaction with friends who are pregnant and families who have children. They may struggle with anxiety-related sexual dysfunction and other marital conflicts.
There are about 40 ways to treat infertility. About 85% to 90% of patients are treated with conventional methods, including advice about timing of intercourse, dru g therapy to promote ovulation or prevent miscarriages, and surgery to repair reproductive organs. Only about 3% of patients make use of more advanced assisted reproductive technology such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). While medical interventions offer much-needed help and hope, studies suggest that they may also add to the stress, anxiety, and grief that patients are already experiencing from infertility itself.

Treatment failure, on the other hand, may trigger a renewed cycle of grieving and distress. The distress may be especially severe for patients living in Western developed nations such as the United States, where the cultural assumption is that anyone who works hard and is persistent will succeed in achieving a goal.
It's also difficult to know when to stop seeking treatment. Frequently one partner wants to end treatment before another, which can strain the relationship. Most patients need to gradually, and with great difficulty, make the transition from wanting biological children to accepting that they will have to pursue adoption or come to terms with being childless.

Additional mental health challenges

Case reports and studies using self-report measures indicate that infertile patients feel more distressed than other people. More rigorous research, however, has concluded that — for the most part — rates of anxiety, depression, and other mental health disorders are not greater than in the general population. Patients may experience serious mental health problems on a transient basis, as they deal with the emotional and physical roller coaster typical of infertility treatment.
For example, one study in Taiwan used a rigorous research instrument — a structured diagnostic interview with a psychiatrist — to examine 112 women seeking assisted reproductive treatment. The women also completed a self-report scale. Levels of anxiety and depression were higher than those found in other populations. Investigators diagnosed anxiety in 23% of the study population, compared with 11% noted in a separate study of outpatients seeking general medical care. They also diagnosed major depression in 17% of the women seeking infertility treatment, compared with 6% in the other patients.
Infertility treatment can also exacerbate existing psychiatric conditions. Infertile women with a history of depression, for example, are more likely than other infertile women to become depressed during treatment.

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Case reports and studies using self-report measures indicate that infertile patients feel more distressed than other people. More rigorous research, however, has concluded that — for the most part — rates of anxiety, depression, and other mental health disorders are not greater than in the general population. Patients may experience serious mental health problems on a transient basis, as they deal with the emotional and physical roller coaster typical of infertility treatment.
For example, one study in Taiwan used a rigorous research instrument — a structured diagnostic interview with a psychiatrist — to examine 112 women seeking assisted reproductive treatment. The women also completed a self-report scale. Levels of anxiety and depression were higher than those found in other populations. Investigators diagnosed anxiety in 23% of the study population, compared with 11% noted in a separate study of outpatients seeking general medical care. They also diagnosed major depression in 17% of the women seeking infertility treatment, compared with 6% in the other patients.
Infertility treatment can also exacerbate existing psychiatric conditions. Infertile women with a history of depression, for example, are more likely than other infertile women to become depressed during treatment.

METHODS

Participants were 1090 consecutive women and men, 545 couples, attending a fertility clinic in Sweden during a two-year period. The Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edn (DSM-IV), was used as the diagnostic tool for evaluating mood and anxiety disorders.

RESULTS

Overall, 862 (79.1%) subjects filled in the PRIME-MD patient questionnaire. Any psychiatric diagnosis was present in 30.8% of females and in 10.2% of males in the study sample. Any mood disorder was present in 26.2% of females and 9.2% of males. Major depression was the most common mood disorder, prevalent in 10.9% of females and 5.1% of males. Any anxiety disorder was encountered in 14.8% of females and 4.9% males. Only 21% of the subjects with a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV received some form of treatment.

CONCLUSIONS (Most Disturbing) 

Mood disorders are common in both women and men undergoing IVF treatment. The majority of subjects with a psychiatric disorder were undiagnosed and untreated.
These Mentally Ill People are the people who buy children in adoption