About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Friday, November 22, 2013

The Anger in Adoptive Parents Toward Their Adoptive Children

ADOPTEE RAGE!

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Anger is an emotion related to one's psychological interpretation of having been offended, wronged, or denied and a tendency to react through retaliation. 
Sheila Videbeck describes anger as a normal emotion that involves a strong uncomfortable and emotional response to a perceived provocation. Raymond Novaco of UC Irvine, who since 1975 has published a plethora of literature on the subject, stratified anger into three modalities: 
1. cognitive (appraisals), 
2. somatic-affective (tension and agitations), 
3. behavioral (withdrawal and antagonism). 
William DeFoore, an anger-management writer, described anger as a pressure cooker: we can only apply pressure against our anger for a certain amount of time until it explodes.
Anger may have physical correlates such as increased heart rate, blood pressure, and levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. 
Anger as an emotion which triggers part of the fight-or-flight  brain response. 
Anger becomes the predominant feeling behaviorally, cognitively, and physiologically when a person makes the conscious choice to take action to immediately stop the threatening behavior of another outside force. 
The English term originally comes from the term anger of Old Norse language. 
Anger can have many physical and mental consequences.
Signs of Anger
The external expression of anger can be found in facial expression, body language, physiological responses, and at times in public acts of aggression. 
 Humans and animals, for example, make loud sounds, attempt to look physically larger, bare their teeth, flaring nostrils and stare (Stink-eye).  
The behaviors associated with anger are designed to warn aggressors to stop their threatening behavior. Rarely does a physical altercation occur without the prior expression of anger by at least one of the participants. While most of those who experience anger explain its arousal as a result of "what has happened to them," psychologists point out that an angry person can very well be mistaken because anger causes loss in self-monitoring capacity and objective observation.
Modern psychologists view anger as a primary, natural, and mature emotion experienced by virtually all humans at times, and as something that has functional value for survival. Anger can mobilize psychological resources for corrective action. Uncontrolled anger can, however, negatively affect personal or social well-being. While many philosophers and writers have warned against spontaneous and uncontrolled fits of anger, there has been disagreement over the intrinsic value of anger. The issue of dealing with anger has been written about since the times of the earliest philosophers. Modern psychologists in contrast to earlier writers of note warn of serious effects of holding in anger.
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The Intentional Cultivation of Anger in the Adoptive Child
An unfortunate fact of adoption is the 25% to 48% failure rates in pre and post adoption finalization., Years after an adoption finalization, now common practices of "wrongful adoption" lawsuits and annulments by adoptive parents. The most serious and distressing new problem for adopted children, An easy quick solution for the unsatisfied adoptive parent. This is a most despicable practice by Adoptive parents who are"Re-Homing" their legally adopted children. Getting out of their financial obligation, working around the legal system by removing physical custody and responsibility the adoptive parents get away with legal dumping of used goods-children. The reality is that adoption is not natural, moral or beneficial to a child with living parents. Adoption disrupts the American nuclear family and adopted children are the number one victims of child abuse in the United States.
The problem before "Re-Homing" was the adoptive parents enduring the last eight years of their financial obligation through psychological exhaustion dealing with a non-biological stranger's child and pretending it is the same as natural born offspring.  When this denial has worn off and the adoptive parent is warn out, the problem of dealing with the outsider becomes a daily reminder of making impulsive decisions of buying children. There are no long term rewards from the broken adopted children who became mortally wounded, defective and sociopathic the day they were removed from their mother. 
 percentage of adoptions 
The forced submission in early childhood training; Strong enforcement in late childhood and the dominating control over the emerging adolescent's normal emerging independence creates hostility, resentment and anger toward the adoptive mother. The Adoptive mother is threatened by the child growing in maturity and worldly awareness., The mother's personal choice not to pursue educational goals beyond high school and feels challenged by the adopted child's growing intellectual capacity, In her failed attempts to suppress the child's educational and intellectual ability cause the mother great anger and jealousy.   
 of the adopted child's personality  
The serious, harmful and psychologically compromising effects of suppressing anger can lead to 
The intolerant adoptive parent's frequent displays of anger toward the adopted child
 can be used as a psychological manipulation strategy for social influence. 

Psychology and Sociology of Anger (Wikipedia.org)


The Anger of Achilles, by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo depicts the Greek hero attackingAgamemnon.
Three types of anger are recognized by psychologists: The first form of anger, named "hasty and sudden anger" by Joseph Butler, an 18th-century English bishop, is connected to the impulse for self-preservation. It is shared between humans and non-human animals and occurs when tormented or trapped. The second type of anger is named "settled and deliberate" anger and is a reaction to perceived deliberate harm or unfair treatment by others. These two forms of anger are episodic. The third type of anger is called dispositional and is related more to character traits than to instincts or cognitions. Irritability, sullenness and churlishness are examples of the last form of anger.
Anger can potentially mobilize psychological resources and boost determination toward correction of wrong behaviors, promotion of social injustice communication of negative sentiment and redress of grievances. It can also facilitate patience. On the other hand, anger can be destructive when it does not find its appropriate outlet in expression. Anger, in its strong form, impairs one's ability to process information and to exert cognitive control over their behavior. An angry person may lose his/her objectivity, empathy, prudence or thoughtfulness and may cause harm to others. There is a sharp distinction between anger and aggression (verbal or physical, direct or indirect) even though they mutually influence each other. While anger can activate aggression or increase its probability or intensity, it is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for aggression.
Rage
The words annoyance and rage are often imagined to be at opposite ends of an emotional continuum: mild irritation and annoyance at the low end and fury or murderous rage at the high end. Rage problems are conceptualized as "the inability to process emotions or life's experiences" either because the capacity to regulate emotion (Schore, 1994  has never been sufficiently developed or because it has been temporarily lost due to more recent trauma. Rage is understood as "a whole load of different feelings trying to get out at once" (Harvey, 2004) or as raw, undifferentiated emotions, that spill out when another life event that cannot be processed, no matter how trivial, puts more stress on the organism than it can bear.
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Anger makes people think more optimistically. Dangers seem smaller, actions seem less risky, ventures seem more likely to succeed, and unfortunate events seem less likely. Angry people are more likely to make risky decisions, and make more optimistic risk assessments. In one study, test subjects primed to feel angry felt less likely to suffer heart disease, and more likely to receive a pay raise, compared to fearful people. 
In inter-group relationships, anger makes people think in more negative and prejudiced terms about outsiders. Anger makes people less trusting, and slower to attribute good qualities to outsiders.
When a group is in conflict with a rival group, it will feel more anger if it is the politically stronger group and less anger when it is the weaker.[26]
Unlike other negative emotions like sadness and fear, angry people are more likely to demonstrate correspondence bias– the tendency to blame a person's behavior more on his nature than on his circumstances. They tend to rely more on stereotypes, and pay less attention to details and more attention to the superficial. In this regard, anger is unlike other "negative" emotions such as sadness and fear, which promote analytical thinking.
An angry person tends to anticipate other events that might cause him anger. She/he will tend to rate anger-causing events (e.g. being sold a faulty car) as more likely than sad events (e.g. a good friend moving away).
A person who is angry tends to place more blame on another person for his misery. This can create a feedback, as this extra blame can make the angry man angrier still, so he in turn places yet more blame on the other person.
When people are in a certain emotional state, they tend to pay more attention to, or remember, things that are charged with the same emotion; so it is with anger. For instance, if you are trying to persuade someone that a tax increase is necessary, if the person is currently feeling angry you would do better to use an argument that elicits anger ("more criminals will escape justice") than, say, an argument that elicits sadness ("there will be fewer welfare benefits for disabled children"). Also, unlike other negative emotions, which focus attention on all negative events, anger only focuses attention on anger-causing events.
Anger can make a person more desiring of an object to which his anger is tied. In a 2010 Dutch study, test subjects were primed to feel anger or fear by being shown an image of an angry or fearful face, and then were shown an image of a random object. When subjects were made to feel angry, they expressed more desire to possess that object than subjects who had been primed to feel fear.
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Passive anger

Passive anger can be expressed in the following ways:
  • Dispassion, such as giving someone the cold shoulder or a fake smile, looking unconcerned or "sitting on the fence" while others sort things out, dampening feelings with substance abuse, overreacting, oversleeping, not responding to another's anger, frigidity, indulging in sexual practices that depress spontaneity and make objects of participants, giving inordinate amounts of time to machines, objects or intellectual pursuits, talking of frustrations but showing no feeling.
  • Evasiveness, such as turning one's back in a crisis, avoiding conflict, not arguing back, becoming phobic.
  • Defeatism, such as setting yourself and others up for failure, choosing unreliable people to depend on, beingaccident proneunderachievingsexual impotence, expressing frustration at insignificant things but ignoring serious ones.
  • Obsessive behavior, such as needing to be inordinately clean and tidy, making a habit of constantly checking things, over-dieting or overeating, demanding that all jobs be done perfectly.
  • Psychological manipulation, such as provoking people to aggression and then patronizing them, provoking aggression but staying on the sidelines, emotional blackmailfalse tearfulness, feigning illness, sabotaging relationships, using sexual provocation, using a third party to convey negative feelings, withholding money or resources.
  • Secretive behavior, such as stockpiling resentments that are expressed behind people's backs, giving the silent treatment or under the breath mutterings, avoiding eye contact, putting people down, gossiping, anonymous complaints, poison pen letters, stealing, and conning.
  • Self-blame, such as apologizing too often, being overly critical, inviting criticism.

Aggressive anger

The symptoms of aggressive anger are:
  • Bullying, such as threatening people directly, persecuting, pushing or shoving, using power to oppress, shouting, driving someone off the road, playing on people's weaknesses.
  • Destructiveness, such as destroying objects, harming animals, destroying a relationship, reckless drivingsubstance abuse.
  • Grandiosity, such as showing off, expressing mistrust, not delegating, being a sore loser, wanting center stage all the time, not listening, talking over people's heads, expecting kiss and make-up sessions to solve problems.
  • Hurtfulness, such as physical violence, including sexual abuse and rapeverbal abuse, biased or vulgar jokes, breaking a confidence, using foul languageignoring people's feelings, willfully discriminating, blaming, punishing people for unwarranted deeds, labeling others.
  • Manic behavior, such as speaking too fast, walking too fast, working too much and expecting others to fit in, driving too fast, reckless spending.
  • Selfishness, such as ignoring others' needs, not responding to requests for help, queue jumping.
  • Threats, such as frightening people by saying how one could harm them, their property or their prospects, finger pointing, fist shaking, wearing clothes or symbols associated with violent behaviour, tailgatingexcessively blowing a car horn, slamming doors.
  • Unjust blaming, such as accusing other people for one's own mistakes, blaming people for your own feelings, making general accusations.
  • Unpredictability, such as explosive rages over minor frustrations, attacking indiscriminately, dispensing unjustpunishment, inflicting harm on others for the sake of it, using alcohol and drugs,[19] illogical arguments.
  • Vengeance, such as being over-punitive, refusing to forgive and forget, bringing up hurtful memories from the past.

Six dimensions of anger expression

Anger expression can take on many more styles than passive or aggressive. Ephrem Fernandez has identified six bipolar dimensions of anger expression. They relate to the direction of anger, its locus, reaction, modality, impulsivity, and objective. Coordinates on each of these dimensions can be connected to generate a profile of a person's anger expression style. Among the many profiles that are theoretically possible in this system, are the familiar profile of the person with explosive anger, profile of the person with repressive anger, profile of the passive aggressive person, and the profile of constructive anger expression.

Causes

People feel angry when they sense that they or someone they care about has been offended, when they are certain about the nature and cause of the angering event, when they are certain someone else is responsible, and when they feel they can still influence the situation or cope with it. For instance, if a person's car is damaged, they will feel angry if someone else did it (e.g. another driver rear-ended it), but will feel sadness instead if it was caused by situational forces (e.g. a hailstorm) or guilt and shame if they were personally responsible (e.g. she crashed into a wall out of momentary carelessness).
Usually, those who experience anger explain its arousal as a result of "what has happened to them" and in most cases the described provocations occur immediately before the anger experience. Such explanations confirm the illusion that anger has a discrete external cause. The angry person usually finds the cause of their anger in an intentional, personal, and controllable aspect of another person's behavior. This explanation, however, is based on the intuitions of the angry person who experiences a loss in self-monitoring capacity and objective observational-ability as a result of their emotion. Anger can be of multicausal origin, some of which may be remote events, but people rarely find more than one cause for their anger. According to Novaco, "Anger experiences are embedded or nested within an environmental-temporal context. Disturbances that may not have involved anger at the outset leave residues that are not readily recognized but that operate as a lingering backdrop for focal provocations (of anger)." According to Encyclopædia Britannica, an internal infection can cause pain which in turn can activate anger.

Cognitive effects