About Adoptee Rage

Statistics Identify large populations of Adoptees in prisons, mental hospitals and committed suicide.
Fifty years of scientific studies on child adoption resulting in psychological harm to the child and
poor outcomes for a child's future.
Medical and psychological attempts to heal the broken bonds of adoption, promote reunions of biological parents and adult children. The other half of attempting to repair a severed Identity is counselling therapy to rebuild the self.

Saturday, November 16, 2013

Reasoning of Emotional Abuse

ADOPTEE RAGE!  

                    Reasoning Of Emotional Abuse
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Psychology of reasoning



The psychology of reasoning is the study of how people reason, often broadly defined as the process of drawing conclusions to inform how people solve problems and make decisions

Development of reasoning

How does reasoning develop? Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development describes a sequence of stages in the development of reasoning from infancy to adulthood. According to the neo-Piagetian theories of cognitive development, changes in reasoning with development come from increasing working memory capacity, increasing speed of processing and enhanced executive functioning and control. Increasing self-awareness is also an important factor.
Psychological abuse, also referred to as emotional abuse or mental abuse, is a form of abuse characterized by a person subjecting or exposing another to behavior that may result in psychological trauma, including anxietychronic depression, or post-traumatic stress disorder.[1][2][3] Such abuse is often associated with situations of power imbalance, such as abusive relationships,bullying, and abuse in the workplace.
Definitions
As of 1996,[4] there are "no consensus views about the definition of emotional abuse." As such, clinicians and researchers have offered sometimes divergent definitions of emotional abuse. However, the widely used Conflict Tactics Scale measures roughly twenty distinct acts of "psychological aggression" in three different categories:
  1. Verbal aggression (e.g., saying something that upsets or annoys someone else);
  2. Dominant behaviors (e.g., preventing someone from contacting their family);
  3. Jealous behaviors (e.g., accusing a partner of maintaining other parallel relations).
According to the University of Illinois counseling center, ″Emotional abuse is any kind of abuse that is emotional rather than physical in nature. It can include anything from verbal abuse and constant criticism to more subtle tactics, such as intimidation, manipulation, and refusal to ever be pleased. Emotional abuse can take many forms. Three general patterns of abusive behavior include aggressing, denying, and minimizing'.″ Even Though there is no established definition for emotional abuse, emotional abuse can possess a definition beyond verbal and psychological abuse. Blaming, shaming, and name calling are a few identifiers of verbal abuse which can affect a victim emotionally. The victim's self worth and emotional well being is altered and even diminished by the verbal abuse and the result is an emotionally abused victim. The victim may experienced severe psychological effects, this would involve the tactics of brainwashing , which can far under psychological abuse as well but emotional abuse consists of the manipulation of the victim's emotions. The victim's emotions are being control by the abuser to where the victim can no longer recognize how to feel towards anything for themselves. Their self concept and independence are being `systematically taken away.
The U.S. Department of Justice defines emotionally abusive traits as including causing fear by: intimidation, threatening physical harm to self, partner, children, or partner's family or friends, destruction of pets and property, forcing isolation from family, friends, or school or work. Subtler emotionally abusive tactics include insults, put downs, arbitrary and unpredictable inconsistency, and gaslighting (the denial that previous abusive incidents occurred). Modern technology has led to new forms of abuse, by text messaging and online cyber-bullying.
In 1996, Health Canada argued that emotional abuse is "based on power and control", and defines emotional abuse as including rejecting, degrading, terrorizing, isolating, corrupting/exploiting and "denying emotional responsiveness" as characteristic of emotional abuse.
 "emotional abuse is characterised by a climate or pattern of behavior(s) occurring over time [...] Thus, 'sustained' and 'repetitive' are the crucial components of any definition of emotional abuse. Andrew Vachss, an author, attorney and former sex crimes investigator, defines emotional abuse as "the systematic diminishment of another. It may be intentional or subconscious (or both), but it is always a course of conduct, not a single event."

Pathology Family Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse of a child is commonly defined as a pattern of behavior by parents or caregivers that can seriously interfere with a child’s cognitive, emotional, psychological or social development. Some parents may emotionally and psychologically harm their children because of stress, poor parenting skills, social isolation, and lack of available resources or inappropriate expectations of their children. They may emotionally abuse their children because the parents or caregivers were emotionally abused during their own childhood. Straus and Field report that psychological aggression is a pervasive trait of American families: "verbal attacks on children, like physical attacks, are so prevalent as to be just about universal. A 2008 study by English, et al.found that fathers and mothers were equally likely to be verbally aggressive towards their children.

Childhood

Behind adult problems, however, there may be deeper forms of emotional baggage rooted in the experiences of childhood, but continuing to trouble personality and behaviour within the adult.
Men and women may be unable to leave the pain of childhood behind, and look to their partners to fix this, rather than to address more adult concerns.
Cultural and parental expectations, and patterns of behaviour drawn from the family of origin and stilll unconsciously carried around, will impact on a new marriage in ways neither partner may be aware of.
Similarly, as parents, both sexes may find their own childhood pasts hampering their efforts at more constructive child-rearing whether they repeat, or seek to overcompensate for, parental patterns of the past.
Psychotherapy addresses such emotional baggage of the client under the rubric of transference, exploring how early development can create an internalised 'working mode' through which all subsequent relationships are viewed; while the concept of countertransference on the therapist's part acknowledges that they too can bring their own emotional baggage into the analytic relationship.